brunswick stew

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by southernboy, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. southernboy

    southernboy New Member

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    anybody got any good brunswick stew recipes ?
     
  2. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    You mean real Brunswick stew, or that stuff that looks like vomit? My Mom made a stew that looked like a stew. You could see stuff floating around and identify what it was. Good stuff. We called it Brunswick stew. Then we moved down south and they had the same name on an entirely different dish.
    Now, I'm not going to launch in to any n/s stuff. If I thought it was so great up there, I'd a moved back instead of staying down here for 36 years. My brother gets 15 FEET of snow a year, on average, and NY gun laws suck. So, while I might not 'be from around here', youse guys are stuck with me. :)
    If you want, I can rustle up my Mom's recipe for 'real' Brunswick stew.

    Dogsbreath
     

  3. GH

    GH Administrator Staff Member

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    Never even heard of it!

    Post a recipe and I'll give it a try. I like to cook across the US (and Canada) by trying regional recipes.
     
  4. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Well, I looked around and haven't found her's yet. I'll check with siblings. This is what wiki says:
    Recipes for Brunswick stew vary greatly, but it is usually a tomato-based stew, containing various types of lima beans/butter beans, corn, okra, and other vegetables, and one or more types of meat. Most recipes claiming authenticity call for squirrel or rabbit meat, but chicken, pork, and beef are also common meats. Some versions have a distinctly smoky taste. Eastern North Carolina Brunswick Stew has potatoes, which thickens it considerably. Eastern Virginia Brunswick Stew tends to be thinner, with more tomato flavor and less smoky flavor.
    The stew essentially resembles a very thick vegetable soup with meat. The key distinguishing factor between soup and Brunswick stew is the consistency. Brunswick stew must be thick; otherwise, it would be vegetable soup with meat added. Most variations have more meat and vegetables than liquid.

    If memory serves, tomato, chicken, lima beans, and corn. With lots of stuff compared to liquid, but the stuff was in more recognizable chunks that what I've seen down here. I don't know where she came up with her recipe, but it sure doesn't agree to closely with authentic stuff. I remember being at a nice restaurant with a friend of mine. He was a cook by trade and knew his way around a spoon. We were there because anther friend worked there. The guy who worked there recommended the BS, but said it was different, but real good. As we were waiting for our meal, I regaled my buddy about 'Mom's BS'. When the stew showed up, it was Mom's! She could have been hiding in the kitchen, it was so close. So, there are at least two people in state that are aware of 'another type' of BS. I'll see what I can find. Can't believe I'm going to look for bs. It usually finds me.

    DB
     
  5. FallingLeaf

    FallingLeaf New Member

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    I'll have to check out the cookbook by uncle had. It was an old fashioned one that his Mom passed down.

    dogsbreath, where are you from? After that put down, I'm wondering.
     
  6. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Put down? Me? Naw. I was 14 when my folks moved out of upstate NY. I'm 50 now, and Dawsonville is home. It is snowing now, but just a little, and nothing to shovel. And that's fine with me.

    db

    oops, I just looked farther up in the post. That put down. Yeah, well, it does, doesn't it? ;-)
     
  7. watahshe

    watahshe New Member

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    Hi I'm rather new, but noticed this.

    dogsbreath does the more lumpy version tastes about the same as the more finely chopped and shredded versions? I think that would be the critical information.
     
  8. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    I don't know. I've not had either in about 20 years. I don't know if I've even had the authentic style even.

    db
     
  9. FallingLeaf

    FallingLeaf New Member

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    We need to find an old old cookbook from the North and from the South and get the two authentic recipes.
     
  10. FallingLeaf

    FallingLeaf New Member

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    Check this out, seems Virginia before the Civil War claims the creation of the stew. There is more to the article than what I posted here.

    http://www.agsas.org/howto/food/brunswickstew.shtml

     
  11. rnc

    rnc New Member

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    vegetable soup recipes..

    Real Brunswick stew has maters, onions and corn....... no other veggies ....... pork, beef, chicken and whatever wild game you might want to add ......my papaw's stew was so thick you could stand a spoon up in it ... ;8)
     
  12. rnc

    rnc New Member

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    Never heard of it :eek::eek::eek::eek::

    Surely you jest :p
     
  13. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Hey guys,
    My Dad and I have breakfast together every Sunday. I asked him about Mom's stew, and he said that that was something they found at a tavern called Chowning's Tavern in Williamsburg on their honeymoon (55 years ago). He said they went back on their 40th, it was still good, but a little more tacky. I found this site:
    http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/do/restaurants/historic-dining-taverns/chownings/
    and they mention their stew. They are closed now, to open in the spring. I've email out to my siblings to see if they have anything written down. I'll holler if I find anything.

    Dogsbreath
     
  14. GeorgiaRebel

    GeorgiaRebel New Member

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    My son-in-law makes good "slap your mama twice" Bruswick stew. He made some the other day and there were no leftovers. That boy can make a great dinner out of rocks, if he had to.
     
  15. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Just got an email back from one of my brothers.....


    Got it, just had to find it. Let me know how it turns out.
    I suppose you could get most of the boxed/frozen/canned veggies fresh; this was written awhile ago. (I didn't know corn came in a box?!) (for you youngsters, frozen fud used to come in little wax boxes. db)

    Brunswick Stew:

    *1/2 box okra, sliced
    1 chicken, cut up (about 4 pounds)
    4 cups water
    4 slices bacon
    1/2 pound beef chuck, cut into 3/4" cubes
    1 small onion, minced
    1 1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon paprika
    1 can (1 pound) tomato (*large)
    1 box frozen lima beans
    *1 box whole-kernel corn
    3 medium potatoes, diced
    seasoned salt and pepper
    Flour (no measurement indicated)

    Cover chicken with water; bring to a boil and cook, covered, one hour or until tender. Cool chicken, remove meat from bones, reservinig broth, and cut into bite-size pieces. Dice bacon and brown in kettle. Remove bacon, and brown beef and oninon in fat remaining in kettle. Add bacon, chicken broth, salt, paprika and tomatoes. Bring to boil, cover and simmer 1 1/2 hours. Add vegetables and chicken and simmer about 30 minutes longer. Season to taste and thicken slightly with a flour-and-water paste. Makes 6 servings.


    That's it, offered with no guarantee nor liability....

    Dogsbreath
     
  16. watahshe

    watahshe New Member

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    thanks for the recipe dogsbreath, I'll have to check on getting the ingredients together and giving it a try. The weather is sure appropriate for it these days.
     
  17. uniongap

    uniongap New Member

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    Here is the one my wife goes by, It is from "The Taste of Georgia" cook book

    2 pounds pork
    1 pound beef
    2 quarts water
    1 (16-ounce)can corn
    1 (16-ounce) can tomatoes
    1 large onion
    1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    2 tablespoon margin
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper
    1/2 dup vinegar
    1 14-once) bottle catsup
    2 potatoes cut into cubes

    Boil meats in 2 quarts of water until tender; cut up finely or grind. Add 1 quart of water in which meats were cooked. Grind corn, onion and tomatoes and add to meat. Add remaining ingredients and boil, cover and simmer for 1 1/2 hours.

    You need to cook a pan of cornbread while you wait for it to finish cooking.
     
  18. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Psssst.....
    Attention all people with a pulse.


    If UnionGap offers you some of his wifes cooking, go for it. If it is chococherrie cake, elbowing the competition out of the way is reasonable. ;-)

    db
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  19. Birddogyz

    Birddogyz Banned

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    Keep that as a mental note. :D