Shotgun for a young kid

Discussion in 'General Hunting Forum' started by buck119, Feb 21, 2014.

  1. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    Hello!

    As per my introduction, I have two young kids. The oldest one is 9. He is already proficient with his 22 carbine and I was thinking about getting a shotgun for the coming turkey season, or if not for this one, to get him ready for next year when he will be 10.

    My experience with shotguns is limited to standard sizes, 12 and 20 Ga. Never used a youth model.

    What would be an ideal shotgun for a kid of his age, if any?

    Ether something that he may use until he is 12 or 13 than it will be passed on to his brother that is 3 years younger. Or a shotgun that he can use for many more years?

    :confused:
     
  2. Birddogyz

    Birddogyz Banned

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    I started mine out on a New England Fire arms single shot .410, as they get older you can get the adult stock to go on it. Depends on how strong they are a 9 years of age. .20 gauge might be a bit much.
     

  3. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    I would not go with a 20.
    But I have never used a .410 so I'm not sure if it ok for turkey.
    I like the idea of the single shot and the only one I saw was very light and manageable, but I see that there are several pump action model as well. I don't know about sizes.
     
  4. Gator

    Gator Member

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    My first day of dove shooting was using a Remington Sportsman 48 20 ga that was borrowed from my great-uncle. I was 11 years old and have never been considered small for my age. I received a Remington 1100 12 ga for Christmas later that year.

    So much depends on the individual child and the gun. The gas operated semi auto running field loads I first shot dove with did not kick as hard as my single shot .410 shooting 3 inchers.

    If possible go with a 20 ga, but you know your young 'uns best of all.

    A Mossberg pump in either .410 or 20 ga would not break the bank.
     
  5. Gator

    Gator Member

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    I witnessed a turkey being taken with a .410, just have to let 'em get a little closer (25 yards or less would be good) and be sure to aim carefully, as there are a lot fewer pellets in the pattern compared to 12 or even a 20 ga.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  6. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Price out .410 and 20 gage shells first. 20's are much cheaper. Bird shot are easy to shoot, and he will probably want to 'man up' and shoot the 'real round'. I'd go with a 20. I've got 4 shot guns, .410 youth, 20, 16, and 12 gage. He is welcome to try them all if that would help.

    Dogsbreath
     
  7. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    If that is not too much disturb for you that would be great.
     
  8. howl

    howl New Member

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    A .410 handload with 18g/cc tungsten shot will take them as far out a standard lead in a 12ga. It's an expensive route to take, but for an alternative to the severe recoil of turkey loads it might be worth it.

    You also have the option of muzzleloaders and crossbows. A .50 cal muzzleloader with 40-50gr of powder has very little recoil and will do the job inside fifty yards.

    If you decide to go with a 20ga shotgun, practice with the lightest loads you can and school the kid on how to hold it under severe recoil. Save the turkey shell for the woods. Nobody notices the recoil when shooting at a live gobbler.
     
  9. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Well, we are having a shoot on March 23, I think we still have room for one or two more. If not, or if you need it sooner, p.m. me and we can set up a Sunday afternoon. I don't have turkey loads in 20 or 410, but I've got some in 12, and they are stout.

    db
     
  10. Birddogyz

    Birddogyz Banned

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    I might have a box or two of .410, we still have my son's .410 even though he is 21 now.
     
  11. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    Thank you for the invite. I'm in. I will PM you. I'll by the ammo.
    Thank you very much!
     
  12. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker New Member

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    410

    Mossberg makes shotguns in 20 ga and .410 caliber with either a standard stock (adult sized), a "bantam" or youth model stock, or something even shorter than that which is basically the size of a Daisy Red Ryder BB gun's stock. Tiny. Something like an 10" or 11" length of pull from the trigger to the butt plate.

    I would recommend a pump over a single shot. That single-shot gun will be OK for training, but odds are that neither of the boys will want it after they get comfortable with shotguns and wingshooting. A single-shot break-open shotgun will always be seen as a "beginner's training gun" to be abandoned once you reach a certain skill level.

    Instead of buying a $150 single-shot shotgun now and a more expensive shotgun later, I suggest just buying a $ 250 Mossberg child-sized pump shotgun right now. Later, you can buy a longer buttstock for $40 or so. That gun will be a "real" shotgun that doesn't have the stimga of "newbie in training" all over it. When your boys get to be full grown and don't even want a .410 anymore, that .410 pump can be used by their girlfriends, or any other smaller-built friends and family.
     
  13. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Ah, different ways to look at things. I like the idea of a starter gun, one that they can graduate away from. I also like the 'one bullet at a time' that the break action gives.
    Also, guns are long lived. New kids keep coming along, be they yours, or your kids.
    I bought a youth .22lr/.410 for a buck60, and have never regretted it.
    Remember, those safes don't fill them selves.

    Dogsbreath
     
  14. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    At the end single shot .410 it is. DB was very kind to let my son try a .410, a 20 and even a really beautiful old Winchester 16 (which I too had the pleasure to try).
    Probably the dimensions more than the kick of the 20 were a little too intimidating for him but the single shot .410 was definitely the winner today.

    Thank you all for your suggestions.
     
  15. phideaux

    phideaux New Member

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    Thats my grandson ,shooting that exact same .410 , his first time shooting a shotgun at 9 yrs old.

    Immediately bought him an exact same model at a pawn shop for $80.
    He is now 12 and will shoot any gun.

    Recognize the guy beside him ?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Jim
     
  16. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    Beautiful picture!

    Sunday my son, when he shot the .410 for the first time had the same expression of when he shot his first .22 round, some years ago. I still remember his face. He was 5 and we had just got back from the NRA show in Charlotte. A friend brought a bolt action carbine to the range and let him try. The first real round after so many BB's. It was like a revelation to him. This Sunday he had the same expression.
    Anyhow, here it is. I have been able to find a brand new "Remington" single shot .410. It looks nice, actually better than I expected. A little heavier than the one that DB let us try but I think it will manageable.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Birddogyz

    Birddogyz Banned

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    Very nice Buck, I bet he is one happy boy.
     
  18. GAgal

    GAgal Banned

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    The .410 is a great little shotgun. He is going to have a ball with that. Good job dad. :)
     
  19. buck119

    buck119 New Member

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    Thank you guys. He has not seen it yet. He does not even know it is here. We told him that he has to earn it so he is working hard on math and other tasks :).

    I am buying some ammo. I assume the 3" will be OK.
     
  20. dogsbreath

    dogsbreath Member

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    Ever give treats to a dog? They don't care how big the piece is, they care how many they get. Buy as much cheap stuff as you can find/afford. But some 'good stuff'. Lots of trigger time/training time with the 'cheap stuff' is valid time/money spent.
    Busted clays from cheap rounds are still busted rounds.

    Dogsbreath